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Online Security Tips

We’ve assembled a list of security awareness tips that should be top of mind for account holders doing any type of online banking, or even just accessing the Internet in general. Many of these are likely things you have heard before, but a little repetition can go a long way. 

  1. Take infections seriously. 
    A virus may not just be a virus. Most of us, if we’re honest, have probably been guilty of thinking that if our PC gets infected with something, it’s not that big of a deal—that’s what our IT department is for, after all. They’ll have whatever the latest nasty bug we’ve contracted wiped from our machine and we’ll be back on track in no time… right? Wrong. These things are not named after scary critters for no reason—they are serious and have serious implications. Think about the effect financial malware can have on your personal finances or to your small business’s network immediately upon download.
     
  2. Control access to your machine. 
    Think twice before walking away from your computer to get that third cup of coffee without first locking it. Even worse is leaving your machine unattended in public, or in the backseat of your car during happy hour. Malicious physical access to devices can be an overlooked attack vector. It’s amazing how quickly files can be dumped or unintended access to sensitive information gained during a quick few minutes away from your machine.
     
  3. Trust but verify. 
    If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Don’t fall prey to schemes that play on your natural inclination to trust. Being trusting is not necessarily a bad thing, but it’s important to verify before taking action. Be wary of things like employment offers to make a quick buck, claims that you are a lucky winner of something, or limited time offers to cash in on an opportunity. Simply put: if it sounds too good to be true, don’t be too quick to believe it.
     
  4. Don’t use insecure Wi-Fi or unknown machines for banking. 
    Sensitive online activity, such as online banking, should only be conducted from a device that belongs to you on a trusted network. Paying a few bills while you’re sipping your favorite latte at a local coffee shop may seem innocent enough, but what do you really know about others who are connected to that public Wi-Fi? Sniffing traffic on a public Wi-Fi connection can be shockingly simple, and can leave everything you are doing on that network free for the taking.
     
  5. “TMI” - Don’t overshare on social media. 
    We may all be guilty of sharing too much information (TMI) at times. Don’t let social media be your outlet for sharing “TMI” about yourself to millions of people all over the world. Social media outlets are information gold-mines for anyone who may be looking to learn more about their next victim. Knowing where you vacation, the name of your pet, and your mother’s maiden name may come in quite handy for someone attempting to impersonate you.
     
  6. If you’ve got it, update it. If you don’t need it, delete it. 
    Updating your software is not something you should do only when your machine slows to an unbearable crawl because it hasn’t been updated in months. Installing the latest versions of software ensures that what you are running has the latest security patches and keeps you protected. Update your software as soon as new releases are announced, and delete any unnecessary programs on your devices that you don’t need in day-to-day business. Installing lots of nonessential software just provides increased exposure points for you and your information.
     
  7. Scrutinize your email. 
    Many of us comb through hundreds of emails every day, and clicking through and opening these emails is second nature. However, email is one of the most common attack vectors and is a quick and easy way for attackers to drop malware onto your PC or mobile device, or to trick you into providing sensitive information. Pay close attention to any emails that appear to come from slightly odd senders, and be extremely wary of any email requesting you to provide or confirm sensitive information. Your financial institution should never ask you to confirm or provide any type of personal information via email. Report suspicious emails to your employer and delete them completely without opening or clicking any contained links.
     
  8. Be mindful of what you plug in. 
    Throwing files onto a USB drive can be a quick and easy way to share information. However, it’s also a quick and easy way to spread malware. Only plug removable media that you know and trust into your devices, and never share these storage devices amongst multiple parties.
     
  9. Knowledge really is power. 
    When it comes to online banking, it pays to be in the know. Use your financial institution’s real time alerts to keep yourself aware of anything that is going on in your account that may not be normal. Setting these alerts to deliver to multiple targets (voice calls, SMS text messages, and email) can help ensure their safe and quick delivery. Notify your financial institution immediately if you receive an alert regarding activity you did not generate.
     
  10. Get away from the “that can’t happen to me” mindset and prepare yourself. 
    Live by the adage that it’s better to be safe than sorry. Believing that “it can’t happen to you” is a very risky position to take. Educate yourself on security precautions that you can take to prevent yourself or your business from becoming a victim. Work to spread the word of online safety to your friends, colleagues and families and be proactive in putting security measures into place.

Source: 
Hinton, Caity. "10 Security Tips Your Account Holders Need to Hear." Q2. Q2 Software, Inc., 20 October 2015. Web. 27 May 2016.